The management of University of Ibadan (UI) said yesterday that it was concluding arrangement to facilitate Senate/Parents Management Consultative Forum with workers, students, parents and guardians.

ui-medical-students-protest-hike-in-school-fees

It said this was to discuss the rationale behind the slight adjustment in accommodation fees.

The meeting, slated for tomorrow, is to among others, douse tension over the decision.

The Senate had recommended increment in hostel fee from N14, 000 to N30,000 for main campus and N40,000 for College of Medicine with effect from 2017/2018 academic session.

Noting the stifled funding from the Federal Government to cater for utilities, the management said it spent about N100 million yearly to augment what was collected in running the hostels, adding that this was no longer sustainable.

The Nation learnt that while students at present paid N14,000 per bed space, the partial economic rate per bed space, according to a 2012 survey conducted by the institution, was put at N59,650 per session.

Vice Chancellor Prof. Idowu Olayinka had said the institution was at a crossroads because managing the hostel based on the old rate was not sustainable, adding that only 30 per cent of the students were accommodated on campus, as the opportunity for hostel accommodation was optional.

The Senate also approved increment in fees for laboratory and studio arts (N5,000); maintenance fees; fees for professional health training (non-clinical (N75,000) and clinical N100,000); pharmacy practice experience levy (N5,000); science laboratory levy (N7,500); Faculty of Agriculture (N5,000 to N7,500); renewable natural resources upward review of the practical year levy (N15,000 to N17,500) for those in practical year; while other students are to pay the old levy.

Other items which attract upward review include access fee for undergraduates (from N2,000 to N2,500) for improved Internet access on campus.

However, fees payable by students in the Faculties of Social Sciences, Law, Sciences and Technology have not been adjusted.

Prof. Olayinka said: “The university is at a point where it is difficult to continue to subside the running of halls of residence and carry out academic functions without a slight adjustment in accommodation charges and in some fees payable by students in some faculties.

“We urge the public to note that it is only the increase in accommodation fees that cuts across students who desire to stay in the halls of residence. Residency in the hall is optional and only about 30 per cent of our students can find accommodation in the halls of residence.

“It is also important to note that the Federal Government, years ago, had stopped providing funds for the running of the halls. As a result, the university spends about N100 million over what is collected as accommodation fees for the running of the halls.

“The university is no longer in a capacity to continue to provide this subvention. It has been very objective in adjusting other fees. For instance, fees were only adjusted for students in the Faculties of Arts, Agriculture, Renewable Natural Resources and Pharmacy. Even in these faculties, the fees are limited to categories of students requiring academic service for which an increase has been approved.

“Let us give two examples. For instance, only 400 level students in the Faculties of Agriculture and Renewable Natural Resources are to pay additional N2,500. These are students in their practical year. Other students in the faculties are not to pay these fees. In the Faculty of Arts also, only 200 and 300 level students in six departments are to pay the studio maintenance fees. Students in departments without studios are exempted from these fees.”